screenflow

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I often find that a quick screencast is the most efficient means to explain something, from how to install/configuration an application to pointing out a problem spot in a block of code.

For example, in the video that follows I talk through the steps I recently explained to another blogger for inserting code into a php file on a WordPress blog to display a Digg icon. The video is short and to the point.

The same idea holds in the next video, no bells or whistles, just a simple description on how to choose a color using the Color Picker application and use the hex value of the selected color to configure style sheet information in an application.

If you are already familiar with creating screencasts, or would like to give it a go, you owe it to yourself to download a free trial of ScreenFlow.

I apologize this video is no longer available. I had a system crash on my web host and was unable to recover the video. To make matters more frustrating I no longer have a copy of ScreenFlow to recreate the video.

Apologies for any inconvenience.

John

In a previous post on using ScreenFlow, I demonstrated some of the basics of this unique application for creating screencasts. What follows is another video demonstrating how to record video separately from audio. Unless you’ve spent time creating a screencast, and have experienced the challenges that come with the same, you might not fully appreciate the value of this feature.

Let me put it this way, I often find it challenging to synchronize all the moving parts, from typing code, clicking the mouse to verbally describing what I’m trying to demonstrate, and if there’s a means to simplify the process, I’m there.

There are tools available for recording video and audio separately, and mixing the two into a final product. However, ScreenFlow offers these capabilities in one tool.

Have a look at the video below to see how I create an audio recording inside of ScreenFlow and merge this with a video recording:

In my short time in working with ScreenFlow, I’ve been impressed with both its ease of use (read, short learning curve) and the powerful and well thought out (and implemented) features to take away some of the pain of creating screencasts.

This post is one in a series demonstrating a very intriguing application for creating screencasts,